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Considerations For Dividing Assets In A Divorce

LAYING DOWN THE LAW

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Vacation Rentals Update:

Congress Passes New Law Regulating

Short Term Rentals

 Our state legislature and Governor have spoken, and short-term rentals are here to stay. Since the inception of online platforms like VRBO and Airbnb nearly a decade ago, short term rentals have steadily grown in popularity, in terms of demand and availability. The opportunity to rent a home or condo for a short duration provides new income opportunity to owners, and new lodging options for travelers and local residents alike. But not everyone is thrilled about short-term rentals in their neighborhoods. Stories abound about wild bachelor parties, wedding venues, and other large groups. Read More

Explaining how easements work

UNDERSTANDING EASEMENTS

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By: Bryan Eastin, Esq.

The Court of Appeals recently issued an opinion explaining how easements can be extinguished in certain circumstances. Specifically, the Court ruled, as a matter of first impression, that common ownership of adjoining parcels might eradicate an easement even if the title owners are technically different.  Here is why this matters. Read More

Phoenix Law Firm, Provident Law, Scottsdale Law Firm

Are Nonrecourse Loans Feasible?

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LAYING DOWN THE LAW
with
Christopher J. Charles, Esq. and David F. Kotter

Are Nonrecourse Loans Feasible?

At first blush, asking a lender for nonrecourse financing seems like someone asking for your first-born child – weird and awkward. But in today’s economic and real estate climate, under the right conditions, nonrecourse loans can make sense.

Practically speaking, most commercial loans are essentially “full recourse,” which means that because many lenders insist on personal guaranties, the guarantors are personally liable for the loan balance – meaning if the borrower defaults, the lender can sue the guarantor (and the borrower in some cases) for the unpaid balance, plus interest, and attorneys’ fees.  And the lender can pursue collection against the guarantor’s non-exempt assets, which typically includes bank accounts, wages, stocks, bonds, automobiles, and of course, real estate. Read More

Understand short-term lease is

Legal Headaches: Can Tenants Sue Their Landlord for Annoyance or Emotional Distress Concerning a Property’s Condition?

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LAYING DOWN THE LAW
with
Christopher J. Charles, Esq. and Philip A. Overcash, Esq.

Legal Headaches: Can Tenants Sue Their Landlord for Annoyance or Emotional Distress Concerning a Property’s Condition?
The Arizona Residential Landlord and Tenant Act, A.R.S. § 33–1301 et seq., (the “Act”), provides a comprehensive framework regulating the rights and responsibilities of landlords and tenants under a lease for residential properties. Arizona courts have interpreted the Act to provide broad protections to tenants, as well as a wide array of damages which the tenant may recover when the landlord breaches the lease.

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WHY MEDIATION TRUMPS LITIGATION

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“Where there are no oxen, the manger is clean, but an abundant harvest comes through the strength of the ox.” Proverbs 14:4. Put another way, if you don’t do any work, you might have a clean stable, but you won’t have any crops. Applying this principal to business, if you are involved with enough real estate deals in this litigious culture, sooner or later, you are bound to run into a dispute. Common real estate disputes include failure to close, lack of proper disclosure, title issues, and other issues concerning the property’s condition. Resolving disputes through the courts is often costly and inefficient.   Read More

Greed Doesn’t Pay: Excessive Interest Charged by Lender May Result in No Interest

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Pigs get fat and hogs get slaughtered. That is why hard-money lenders should avoid seeking hyper aggressive interest rates. Although conventional mortgage interest rates remain historically low, interest rates on private loans, or “hard money” loans range anywhere from 5% to multiples of the principal amount. But if lenders overreach, they may end up forfeiting all interest. Indeed, the defenses of usury and unconscionability are alive and well. Read More

Judgment Liens and Homestead Properties

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COURT RULES THAT JUDGMENTS DO NOT ATTACH AS LIENS TO HOMESTEAD PROPERTIES

Most civil cases never reach the trial stage.  Instead, they are settled before trial.  However, in those smaller percentage of cases that proceed all the way to trial, the Court will award to the prevailing party a judgment.  These judgments are typically recorded with the local county recorder’s office so that the judgment can attach as a “judgment-lien” on any non-exempt property owned by the debtor. Read More

ARE USURY LAWS STILL RELEVANT?

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One of the greatest misconceptions of Arizona law is that usury is no longer a viable cause of action. In the 1980s, Arizona amended the usury laws to remove the interest rate ceiling.  As a result, today’s usury laws essentially authorize lenders to contract for any interest rate. However, usury remains a viable defense against lenders who breach their own contracts by charging fees that aren’t allowed. Read More

Separation Agreements in Arizona

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Separation Agreements (A.R.S. § 25-317)

Sometimes married couples decide to separate, either in anticipation of divorce, giving one or both of the parties “some space,” or simply living separately for a while in hopes of sorting out their feelings and possibly reconciling.  Under Arizona law, married couples can remain married but enter into a legal contract governing their financial matters – the handling of property, debt or even support.  This is called a separation agreement and is controlled by A.R.S. § 25-317.   The Court of Appeals recently ruled that per the statute, for these separation agreements to be enforceable, the terms cannot be unfair.  Buckholtz v. Buckholtz, No. 1 CA-CV 17-0596 FC, filed January 15, 2019. Read More

Death and taxes: The Statutory Requirements for Purchasing, Redeeming and Foreclosing on Tax Liens in Arizona

By | Articles, Real Estate

Two things in life are certain: death and taxes. And if you don’t pay your taxes, there can be severe consequences. For example, if you fail to pay your property taxes, someone else can swoop in, pay the tax liability, and then ultimately claim title to your property.

Under Arizona law, a tax levied on real property is a lien on the assessed property. Read More